UCSD JSOE JSOE

Advising

Advising FAQ

3.1. General Advising

(3.1.1) What's the Bioengineering Student Affairs Office ?
(3.1.2) Do I have to make appointment to talk to an undergraduate advisor?
(3.1.3) Why do I need a flowchart?
(3.1.4) What does the HSS box mean on my flowchart?
(3.1.5) How can I get a professional healthcare mentor?
(3.1.6) How can I get an upperclassman mentor?
(3.1.7) I cant sign up for a class on Tritonlink for one reason or another although I know I should be able to take it. What can I do?
(3.1.8) I dislike my college. How can I change it?
(3.1.9) My grades are poor this quarter. How can I know if it's just going to get worse?

3.2. Freshman Students

(3.2.1) Can I still apply for Bioengineering or Bioengineering: Biotechnology majors if I was admitted to UCSD with a different major?
What is the minimum GPA necessary to get into the Bioengineering: Premedical major from the Pre-Bioengineering: Premedical status?

3.3. Transfer Students

(3.3.1) What are the minimum numbers of units required for transfer students wishing to apply for Bioengineering majors?
(3.3.2) Is there a cutoff GPA for admission?

3.4. Current Students

(3.4.1) Can a student take BIPN 105 as a technical elective?
(3.4.2) I want to Double Major or Minor, is this possible in Bioengineering?


3.1. General Advising

(3.1.1) Q: What's the Bioengineering Student Affairs Office?

A: The Bioengineering Student Affairs Office is comprised of professional staff who administrate the degree-granting programs and who provide advice to students. The Office is located on the first floor of the Powell-Focht Bioengineering Hall (PFBH), next to the elevators. This is where you can talk to advisors about any questions you may have about anything related to your stay here at UCSD as a Bioengineer. Please see the undergraduate affairs website Contact Us section for the current hours (currently Monday - Friday, 9 AM - Noon, and 1 PM - 3:30 PM. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11; Prof. Robert Sah, 2007.08.18)

(3.1.2) Q: Do I have to make appointment to talk to an undergraduate advisor?

A: Making an appointment prior to the visit is recommended. However, if it???K??s a quick question, students may come in during the drop-in advising hours (Mon, Tues: 11am-12pm & Wed, Thurs: 1:30pm-3:30pm). E-mailing the questions are also a good way to get short questions answered. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11)

(3.1.3) Q: Why are the flowcharts necessary?

A: An updated flowchart is an efficient way to document progress toward completing the requirements for graduation. It is helpful for students, and advising staff, to understand student progress towards graduation. Because this is so important, the undergraduate advisors will see a student during drop-in hours only if they have an updated flowchart with you. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11; Prof. Robert Sah, 2007.08.18)

(3.1.4) Q: What does the HSS box mean on my flowchart?

A: Humanities and Social Science courses are a degree requirement of each college at UCSD. They are provided as an empty spot in your schedule during which time it is recommended you take a general education requirement or other college-required course in it's place. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11; Prof. Robert Sah, 2008.08.18)

(3.1.5) Q: How can I get a professional healthcare mentor?

A: The UCSD Health and Medical Professions Preparation Program (HMP3) offers a Health Professions Mentor Program (HPMP) which provides an inside look at the student's desired profession, plus the opportunity to develop a relationship with a professional mentor in the field. UCSD undergraduate participants are paired with health care professionals in their field of choice, gaining invaluable experience designed to make them more competitive in the application process. Applications open in February, with the mentorship continuing to the end of school in June. Priority is given to junior and senior level students, and the number of mentors is limited. HMP3??Gs site is: http://aep.ucsd.edu/hpp.html. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11)

(3.1.6) Q: How can I get an upperclassman mentor?

A: BMES, the UCSD Undergraduate Student chapter of the Biomedical Engineering Society, offers a great MENTOR/MENTEE program. In this program, freshmen and sophomore students are paired with junior and senior mentors. Mentors act as a point of contact for mentees and are there to answer any questions you might have. This program is year-round, and information on it can be found by accessing: http://bmes.ucsd.edu. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11; Prof. Robert Sah, 2007.08.18)

(3.1.7) Q: I can't sign up for a class on Tritonlink for one reason or another although I know I should be able to take it. What can I do?

A: Your first trip should be to that department's building and to get it cleared out with them. Most of the time, thats all it takes. Other times, theyll send you packing with a Add/Drop card that you need to get signed by the professor of the class in question. You can then take the signed card to the Registrar where they can Add/Drop you on the spot. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11)

(3.1.8) Q: I dislike my college. How can I change it?

A: Youre not allowed to change colleges until after one full year with that college. After this time, you may petition with the destination college for a transfer. Keep in mind that a successful transfer may add non-overlapping GEs to your schedule. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11)

(3.1.9) Q: My grades are poor this quarter. How can I know if its just going to get worse?

A: Considering the required departmental courses and General Education requirements (GEs) can help you to judge your ability to take on increasingly difficult workloads and schedules. For Revelle students in particular, if five courses (including GEs) in one quarter proves to be too much, you may want to reconsider your options as Bioengineering classes will become increasingly more difficult later on. Fortunately, there are quite a few places you can go to make sure it doesnt get worse. Go to a college advisor, make an appointment with an advisor in the BSA Office, check out the free UCSD tutoring that is available either through OASIS or Tau Beta Pi, sit down and talk with your TAs, professors, RAs or even past students and alumni. The more people you talk to, the better informed you will be as to whether or not youre making the right decision. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11; Prof. Robert Sah, 2007.08.18)

3.2. Freshman Student Advising

(3.2.1) Q: Can I still apply for Bioengineering or Bioengineering: Biotechnology majors if I was admitted to UCSD with a different major?

A: No, The only way for a student to become a Bioengineering or Bioengineering: Biotechnology major as a freshman at UCSD is to be directly admitted from high school at the time of entrance into UCSD. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11)

(3.2.2) Q: What is the minimum GPA necessary to get into the Bioengineering: Premedical major from the Pre-Bioengineering: Premedical status?

A: Pre-Bioengineering: Premedical majors who have achieved a GPA of 3.0 or better in the eight required pre-major courses (Mathematics 20A-B-C; Physics 2A-B; Chemistry 6A; MAE 9 or 10, and one other pre-bioengineering course by the end of the freshman year) are assured of admission into the Bioengineering: Premedical major. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11)

3.3. Transfer Student Advising

(3.3.1) Q: What are the minimum numbers of units required for transfer students wishing to apply for Bioengineering majors?>

A: The required minimum of ninety quarter transfer units must include eighteen quarter-units of calculus, twelve quarter-units of calculus-based physics, and the highest level computer science course offered at their community college. Beginning fall 2007, ten quarter units of general chemistry (including laboratory), will be part of the required transfer units. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11)

(3.3.2) Q: Is there a cutoff GPA for admission?

A: Although the actual required GPA cutoff depends on the number of openings, at least a 3.2 GPA in the community college transfer courses, and a 3.4 GPA in math, physics, and computer science courses, are likely to be needed to gain admission. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11)

3.4. Current Student Advising

(3.4.1) Q: Can a student take BIPN 105 as a technical elective?

A: No, much of the material in BE 172 and BIPN 105 are similar. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11)

(3.4.2) Q: I want to Double Major or Minor, is this possible in Bioengineering?

A: While its definitely possible to do so, it will make it much more difficult to graduate in four years. Students who Double Major or Minor typically have a lot of AP credit, take many summer classes, and have a large workload each quarter. Keep in mind that your second major or minor cannot be engineering-related due to Jacobs school restrictions. (Margene Wight, 2007.06.11; Prof. Robert Sah, 2007.08.18)

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