Feasibility Study of a Fully Implanted Long-term Glucose Sensor/Telemetry System in Diabetic Subjects

Friday, Apr 10, 2015
Fung Auditorium, Powell-Focht Bioengineering Hall
David Gough

Professor of Bioengineering, UCSD and Co-Founder, GlySens, Inc.

Feasibility Study of a Fully Implanted Long-term Glucose Sensor/Telemetry System in Diabetic Subjects

Abstract: 
Achieving good blood glucose control in people with diabetes requires frequent blood glucose monitoring by a means that is widely acceptable to users. To this end, UCSD and GlySens, Inc., have collaborated on development of a fully implanted long-term glucose sensor/telemetry system. Reported here will be feasibility studies of the application of this system in a small group of people with T1D and T2D during repeated blood glucose clamps and spontaneous glucose excursions over a 6-month period. Also to be discussed is a glucose mass transfer model that predicts the dynamic sensor signals from venous blood glucose measurements, and allows assessment of the effects of local physiologic phenomena that affect the sensor signals, including glucose diffusion in the tissues, insulin-dependent glucose uptake by local tissues, the dynamics of the sensor itself, and measurement noise.
Bio: 

David Gough obtained a PhD from the University of Utah, did post-doctoral studies at the Joslin Clinic of Harvard Medical School, and was an Associate at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital before coming to UCSD. Dr. Gough co-founded GlySens, Inc., in 1998, with a former student Dr. Joseph Lucisano. He has 18 patents and has received a number of awards for his work on glucose sensing technologies. He teaches mass transfer, biocontrols, medical device engineering and entrepreneurism.